Category Archives: Public Relations

Things I Like About My Job, part 1

I have officially been an intern at SHIFT Communications for a week and a half now and it has been pretty great! The first few days were spent being introduced to everybody in the office and figuring out which accounts everybody was in charge of… That along with trying to keep up with all the acronyms thrown around in emails and everyday speech wore me out.

Luckily, after diligently shadowing a few people on their accounts, I’ve been able to catch up a little bit and have even been handed some of my own responsibility. That’s pretty exciting, but I’m glad that I’ve had a bit of time to get used to the type of work I would be doing and the office environment.

It’s not that I haven’t had jobs with real responsibilities before (hello, I was a nanny for 4 years – if that’s not responsibility, I don’t know what is), but I’ve never really worked in an office like this before. By that I mostly mean that I’ve never had coworkers my own age – one of the things that I was really looking forward to when I entered the “real world.”

Having coworkers my own age isn’t the only thing that makes me happy about where I am right now. Here are some things that make me smile about my job:

  • I work in San Francisco (which is pretty awesome)
  • It’s nice to see so many people are around my age that have accomplished so much – it makes me believe that I can accomplish those things too!
  • Everybody is super nice
  • I get to say things like “I’ll be back soon, just gotta run out and grab something for a client”
  • I actually have clients (or at least am working with teams that have clients)
  • The office is laid back and professional all at the same time
  • Thus far I haven’t been bored (yeah, I know, I’ve only been here for a week and a half… but that’s a good start!)
  • We are all in cubes which means people just stand up over their cubes and talk to each other
  • Sometimes you can hear people talking on the phone… to somebody else in a different cube across the room – this makes me smile
  • I have coworkers my own age (I had to include it)
  • …and a majority of them are women which means I am able to pick up on their impeccable fashion sense
  • I get to spend time reading recent articles about things that I’m interested in – and it’s all part of the job!
  • Everybody is hilarious, which means that people will be in fits of laughter at random times throughout the entire day

There are more, but those are the things that come to my mind right now. Is there anything better than a job that you enjoy doing, makes you smile, and combines so many of your passions? I think not!

What do you like about your job?

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And So It Begins

I feel as though everything in my life has been leading up to now. I’ve always had dreams for myself: go to college, live in a big city, have good relationships with my family members, get a great job, be proud of myself, be happy.

As of last week, I can finally say that I have accomplished all of those things thus far:

  • I graduated from college in June.
  • I have wonderful relationships with all four of my parents and all of my siblings, not to mention my extended family.
  • I signed the lease for an apartment in San Francisco.
  • I have an internship at a great company and I couldn’t be happier about it.
  • I am proud of myself and all I have accomplished – especially the apartment and internship, two things that happened last week.
  • I might not be as happy as I could be, but I’m working on it and all the things I just listed sure do help.

Of course, I haven’t officially moved in to my apartment (that happens this weekend) and I haven’t actually started my internship (I begin tomorrow), but man, I just feel like my life is really taking off!

Don’t get me wrong, there are a lot of things that I still want to accomplish in my life, but I am just now starting to feel like a real adult. All of my goals until now have been for my younger self. They were for the me that existed before 2012. The me that was focused on my profession, friends, and dreams. The 22-and-younger me only knew a life that consisted of classes, homework, papers, to and from campus, etc. etc. This new me, the 23-and-older me, has moved on from school, is entering the corporate world, and is ready for new challenges and experiences.

Now, even though it is only 8:20pm, I think I am going to go pick out my outfit for tomorrow, crawl in to bed, read a book, and get a good night’s sleep before my big day tomorrow.

San Francisco, I’m ready for you!


Friday Links 2012: Week 5

This week was so crazy. I hardly had time to check email and read my morning websites. In fact, I don’t think I read my normal allotment of sites a single day this week, so I apologize for the lame links.

As I said in my other blog, I’m not quite ready to share everything with Cyber Land yet, but I promise it will happen within the next few days.

Anyway, here you go:

And a picture from today just because I thought this tea was pretty.

(**Squeals!!**)

I hope your week was productive and that your February started out wonderfully!


Friday Links 2012: Week 3

If you spent any amount of time online this week, you noticed that the Stop Online Piracy Act (or SOPA as we all begrudgingly know it) pretty much took over all aspects of the Interweb. Just about every website, blog, and Twitter feed was inundated with information about SOPA, and mine wasn’t any different. Although I did spare you all from seeing yet another blog post talking about what SOPA is and the implications the bill would have on our freedom of speech if passed, that doesn’t mean that I didn’t Tweet about it as obnoxiously as the next person. For this, I apologize.

Originally, most of this week’s links were going to be about SOPA and understanding what, exactly, the bill says. Even though I took a couple law classes in my undergrad career, the legal jargon of bills is still confusing. If you are anything like me and can’t comprehend what the bill is saying but still want to know what the heck is going on, some of my links might help you.

Ironically, my first link will explain to you why the rest of my SOPA links aren’t all that important anymore, and therefore, aren’t posted here. Hooray! (Plus, I wan’ted to keep you from going insane.)

Have a fantastic weekend.

Want more of me because you are just so intrigued by my thrilling life? Don’t worry, you can always see my favorite personal Tweets and photos of the day at Rachel Discovers Happiness.


A Lowe(‘s) Blow

As a PR professional, I know that it is not necessarily a good idea to speak out about things that could later get you in trouble. PR is all about image and following the mission of the organization/person being represented. Maintaining the image of a company is a tricky thing – you don’t want to upset your consumers, investors, or the general image of your company because that may affect sales/perception. On that note, I think it is important for people to remember that their actions do affect others.

That’s why I am (sort) shedding my PR role right now in order to give you my opinion on a big PR issue going on at the moment. What happened is this:

The TV channel TLC, known for it’s controversial shows such as 19 Kids and Counting, Sister Wives, Toddlers & Tiaras, and My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding, came up with an all new show this season – All American Muslim. The creation of this show caused a major advertiser – Lowe’s – to pull its advertising from the program. Needless to say, this caused an uproar from liberals, conservatives, progressives, Christians, Muslims, Lowe’s shoppers, TLC watchers, and many more. Many comments, letters (and here), and opinions have chastised Lowe’s for its discrimination of Muslims and their heritage; however many have also come out in support of Lowe’s decision to remove advertising from the show. Since the announcement of the removal of its advertising, Lowe’s has posted an apology on Facebook which was subsequently taken down due to disrespectful and harshly worded comments. Lowe’s then posted a follow-up comment that can be seen below:

self-taken screen shot from Lowe's Facebook page

Anyway, the purpose of this post is not to chastise Lowe’s for making a (what I believe to be poor) business decision. This post was sparked by an article I read earlier today (or yesterday?) about the 25 Dumbest Comments on Lowe’s Facebook Page and was infuriated by what people said and how ignorant they are, the purpose is to call out the people who are supporting Lowe’s decision with the argument that it is in “America’s best interest” and that Muslims are not “true Americans.” My questions for them is: what, exactly, is a “true American”? Is it somebody who is born in the United States? Does it depend on the color of your skin? Your religion? How long your family has been in the States? The amount of education you have? I’m serious, what exactly is a “true American”?! Would you consider me a true American? I am white, Christian, and pay American taxes. What if I told you that I was second generation American? That my grandparents came from Germany and England – one leaving Germany out of fear for his family with Jewish roots. Am I still a true American in your eyes?

I know we have all heard this before but I will say it again: this country was founded, amongst other things, on the freedom of religion. In case you forgot, here are the words written on the Declaration of Independence – a document written by our Founding Fathers after white christians left Europe and fought against the British for their freedom of religion and independence from prejudice. They wanted to create a country where people could practice the religion they wanted – without being persecuted. Just to refresh your memory, here are the first words written on the Declaration of Independence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Now, I’m not going to give you a lecture (anymore than I have) on what the Constitution and Declaration of Independence have to say about the American people’s right to freedom. What I am going to say is that sometimes I am sorely disappointed by the people I call neighbors and fellow Americans. All of us came here from somewhere, at some point. Just because you have lived in the United States longer than others does not make you any more or less patriotic than somebody who moved here ten or twenty years ago.

Perhaps I will be labeled as the “classic liberal,” but I think that there is something to be said about being open minded and listening to other people’s opinions. Before you argue with me, I do realize that being open minded also includes understanding that not everybody is as open minded as me and that other people will have different opinions, but that doesn’t mean that those people have to impart their opinions on me and others. Just because you think you are right, doesn’t mean you are. Yes, I know, that means that I could be wrong. I am willing to risk it.

Here is a little insight on the roots of my beliefs:

The other day I got into a conversation with my dad about what I was like when I was little. The first thing he said was that I was sensitive (surprise, surprise – the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree). The second thing he said was that I didn’t see color, religion, or sexual orientation. I didn’t care whether someone was black, white, green, Christian, Jewish, atheist, straight, or gay. As long as they treated others well, everybody was the same to me. In fact, when I was 3 and attending preschool in El Cerrito, CA, I was exposed to a lot of ethnicity: the main preschool teacher was Sikh, another teacher was white, and another was black. My dad said I didn’t pay attention to their skin color – instead of saying “my white teacher” or “my black teacher,” I said “the teacher with the light hair” (meaning my white teacher) and “the teacher with the dark hair” (meaning my black teacher).

As I thought about that story, I got wistful for those days of innocence, for the days when no prejudice based on color or religion clouded my opinions of people. I try to keep myself from pre-judging people, but sometimes it is hard. Sometimes I find myself thinking about other races and applying stereotypes to them, or looking at other Christians and judging them for their extremist views, or vegetarians for their judgmental comments. At those times I have to step back and remind myself that everybody has a right to be who they are and believe what they think is true. It is not my right to get in their way.

I suppose the best I can hope for is that, by the time I have grandchildren, they will live in a world (or at least an America) where people aren’t persecuted for their beliefs. An America where the Constitution and Declaration of Independence are actually followed.

Finally, I will leave you with a quotation from Nazi opposer Martin Niemöller:

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out — Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out —Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out —Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me — and there was no one left to speak for me.

And now that I’m done with my (not-so) mini rant, have a wonderful night.


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